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Abstract

The potent pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β & TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) were investigated
for its effect on β-sitosterol enriched fraction from the methanolic extract of leaves of Mallotus philippensis (Lam.)
Muell. Arg. The n-butanol part of the methanolic extract was eluted using mixtures of solvents of increasing
polarity. From the combined eluted fractions, three fractions such as F1, F2 and F3 were collected by column
chromatography using n-hexane: Chloroform (1:1) as a solvent and the compounds present in the fractions were
identified by GC-MS. Among the collected fractions, the F1 was found to be the β-sitosterol enriched fraction
(β-SEF). The maximum non-lethal dose of β-SEF was found to be 1000 mg/kg body weight using OECD 423
guidelines. The effect of β-SEF (100 mg/kg), almost 10 times less than the standard drug Diclofenac sodium
(10 mg/kg), and it was determined against inflammation by carrageenan induced hind paw edema method. β-SEF
produced a dose dependent decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokines like IL-1β and TNF-α and increase
anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 level in the inflamed paw. Treatment with Diclofenac sodium (10 mg/kg) and
β-SEF (30 and 100 mg/kg) significantly decreased the NF-B expression in inflamed rats which concludes the
reduction of inflammation was probably by decreasing the expression of NF-B.

Keywords

Mallotus philippensis β-sitosterol enriched fraction Inflammatory cytokines Western blot analysis

Article Details

How to Cite
S Sathya, & A Puratchikody. (1). Role of β-sitosterol enriched fraction from the methanolic extract of leaves of Mallotus philippensis (Lam.) Muell. Arg. on inflammatory cytokines. International Journal of Research in Pharmacology & Pharmacotherapeutics, 5(SPL1), 1-8. Retrieved from https://ijrpp.com/ijrpp/article/view/411

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